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There's More to That Story with Michael Barticel - Part 1



In part 1, it's Michael Barticel of The Good People Effect Podcast who interviews Sylvain. Originally intended to be published only under Michael's podcast, it felt right to exceptionally share this conversation as part of a two-episode series called "There's More to That Story". If you've wanted to get to know me, this is your chance.


Check out the Good People Effect Podcast Website or on YouTube and Instagram!






Podcast Transcription:


Sylvain: Hey, it's Sylvain! And this is the handpan podcast.

Today, I am delighted to bring you not one but two new podcast episodes. We're going to call it a part 1 and a part 2 but these are two different conversations I had with my new friend Michael Barticel.

Michael is the host of The Good People Effect podcast. It's a show about purpose, adventure and creativity—and it's got a whole lot of handpan stories too! Michael kindly invited me on his podcast, and we had such a good time that I asked him if he'd be willing to be on the handpan podcast. I'm so glad he agreed (that's why I'm calling the episode "There's More to that Story") and we are bringing you both conversations right here on the handpan podcast, as well as on the Good People Effect podcast.

This episode, part 1, is Michael interviewing me. So, if you've been curious to hear more of my own story, well, this is your chance. And part 2 is me interviewing Michael whose life, it seems, could be made into a movie some day. Michael is kind, humble and honest and I'm so grateful he reached out. I definitely made a new friend, and I'm excited to share these conversations with you because they were so refreshing and inspiring to me. So, here we go:


Sylvain: Hey, it's Sylvain and this is the handpan podcast


Sylvain: Today. I am delighted to bring you, not one but two new podcast episodes. We're gonna call it a part one and a part two, but these are two different conversations I had with my new friend Michael Barticel. Michael is the host of the good people effect podcast. It's a show about purpose, adventure, and creativity and it's got a whole lot of handpan stories too. Michael kindly invited me on his podcast and we had such a good time that I asked him if he'd be willing to be on the handpan podcast. I'm so glad he agreed. That's kind of why I called this episode. There's more to that story and we're bringing you both conversations right here on the handpan podcast as well as on the good people effect podcast. This episode, part one is Michael interviewing me. So if you've been curious to hear more about my own story, well this is your chance. And part two is me interviewing Michael whose life it seems could be made into a movie someday. Michael is kind, humble and honest and I'm grateful he reached out. I definitely made a new friend and I'm excited to share these conversations with you because they were so refreshing and inspiring to me. So here we go.


Michael: how's it going? How's life? Talk to me.


Sylvain: Good. How are you Michael? It's nice to connect.


Michael: It's great to connect. Um, I was just thinking the same thing today. I was like, here's another podcast there that also has a show that's, you know, has the hand pan as a key element. And it's, it was funny when I came across you, I was like, I really need to reach out to this guy and, and just see if we can, I don't know, have a chat. I just feel like it would be interesting.


Sylvain: Well, I'm so glad you did. Um, because it's not very often that we, uh, take a chance and reach out to someone completely new and, um, you know, whenever I've done that in my life, the outcomes and the new ideas that have come out of that have really changed the trajectory of my life. So I'm glad that you decided to email me out of the blue. I'm glad that you persevered cause uh, the summer was busy and it took me a while to get back to you.


Michael: Yeah, yeah. I totally agree with, with what you said. I mean when you, when you do kind of take those chances and go into these unknown directions and you just go with how you feel, it usually ends up being something great. So, um, yeah, I've been really looking forward to this chat today and I really enjoy your podcast, the handpan podcast. It's been a delight to listen to. Um, but I just, I guess I just wanted to, I wanted to interview you for a change because you speak to a lot of people and it's very different. Um, having like when you're as, as a podcast to be interviewed yourself, it's, it's, it's a very, it just kind of changes things up again. So how did this, I just wanted to know, like how did all this , all this journey began and, and, um, can you take me, I know it's a difficult question in some respect, but can you take me back to the beginning?


Sylvain: sure. And again, just to, I want to reiterate that it's extremely kind of you to, to ask me to be on your show. And you're right, it is kind of funny to be on the opposite side of the podcast.


Michael: Yeah.


Sylvain: Um, but, um, but it's exciting too because you're right, when you do a podcast, you don't necessarily get to share your story as much. Um, but you know, my story, um, started in a pretty unremarkable way. And I don't mean that in any negative sense, but I, I'm from France, I was born in France. My entire family is French. My grandparents, my great grandparents, you know, there was nothing international in my background. I think I never got on a plane until I was 18. I never traveled as a kid. Um, and in 2011, uh, I moved to the United States as an exchange student. And I've lived here ever since, and that's been one of the greatest adventures of my life. Um, one of the things that I'm the most proud of, it's been difficult, but, um, so much meaning has come out of this experience. Um, so that's a little bit about, uh, where I'm from and where I live. Now. You know, I think something that might help your listeners kind of get a sense for who I am because when you press the play button, you hear a new voice, you don't always know who your, who you're hearing from. Um, you know, long before, um, I knew anything about psychology long before I had a notion of, of my, my personality or temperament. You know, I think it's later in life that we develop these psychological frameworks that help understand how we see the world and how we see ourselves in it. Um, you know, I've always operated emotionally. Um, I'm of a, a melancholic temperament, uh, which means that I tend to experience very strong feelings, very high highs of ecstasy, you know, and very low lows. Um, and, and so that kinda helped, helps reframe, um, who I am and what I'm drawn to. I am very sensitive to art and beauty. Um, and one of the things that I, I, I really kind of recognize in retrospect is that I am, um, a contrarian and what this means is I'm, I'm a drawn to the unique, to the special, to the extraordinary. And, um, and as you know, you, you mentioned the handpan and I know you play the hand pan as well. We're within that realm. Right? Um, and so that's played a big, big role in my life.


Michael: So besides the handpan, where else have you, have you been able to find this kind of unique uniqueness in life?


Sylvain: You know, I am drawn to philosophy and faith. Um, I think that this life that we live, um, even though the way that we experience it is ordinary, right? The mundane routine, the daily grind, um, it is still amazing, right? Um, to think that you and I, we were created, we were born without our own permission. You know, from the day you get on this earth. Um, there a countdown not to be, you know, gloomy or anything, but it's almost like we arrived too late by the time we get here, there's already a countdown. Um, and this theme of finitude, um, is very prevalent in, in philosophy. Um, you know, so I'm drawn to these really big concepts that have no really tangible answer, but I think they do provide some value for our day to day. Um, as I said, you know, I'm drawn to the special to the unique. And so when, when life gets boring, when you get stuck, I think these bigger questions can, um, lead you to, um, a, a wellbeing, um, through, you know, primarily thankfulness and gratitude. Because even though we didn't choose this life, you know, you didn't choose where you were born when you were born. Uh, the color of your skin, your gender, your social economic background, you do live and you're here. And, um, that's all, you know, that's all I know. And we can, we can resent it or we can take it as a gift. And so this is where I find meaning in my life as well.


Michael: Like you mentioned philosophy and faith and do you feel like going away as an exchange student in any way kind of connected to that, enhance that?


Sylvain: It's an incredibly powerful and impactful experience to go study abroad or to go travel, you know, you don't have to live there or to study there. Um, what it does is, I don't know if you've ever, ever heard the image of the fish in water. So the fish is swimming in water, water is clear, it's invisible. Um, and really the fish has no idea that there's this thing called water all around him. But if you take the fish out of water, it's gasping for air. It, it doesn't know its new environment and it realizes looking back, Hey, that was water. Um, you know, I think moving abroad or traveling in general, um, or opening yourself to new experiences, trying something new for the first time, um, it does that you look back and you, you realize that what you thought was it, what you thought was, uh, maybe a universal truth. It was just water. It was just one thing and it kind of gives you a new perspective on that. Um, so it truly did that for me. Um, now you know, the whirlwind of, of, of, of emotions and inspirations and insights that you get from experience, uh, traveling or moving abroad at the time you sort of ride it like a wave. You don't interpret that, you don't really make sense of that. Um, but in retrospect you can find those themes and...


Michael: I feel like in some way, my first trip abroad, I'm not sure if it would have been the same as an exchange. I mean, I've never been on an exchange, but just traveling anywhere, it really opens you up. And I found in my own experience, it opened me up a lot towards what you were, what you were mentioning earlier. You know, this, this feeling of connection, this feeling of, you know, a growth. You're pondering these questions that you know, even if you're not, might not know the answer or the answers might seem like they're a bit of a paradox. Then just pondering the question and just kind of thinking in that kind of a way opens you up to different ideas and thoughts. But I feel, I feel like travel has in my own journey has had a real deep responsibility for that or at least has added to it.